Finding inspiration in even the most mundane of tasks

Posts Tagged ‘Annotation’

Preview Your Leader

In Revit on October 4, 2012 at 5:35 am

I just realized I never shared this tip. It’s something that drove me nuts until I figured it out. Sometimes when adding a keynote, the keynote tag would be visible while placing, but not the leader. After placement, the leader and keynote both show up just fine. In my case, the reason was that my current workset was one that was hidden in the view. Changing the current workset to one that was visible brought back the leader visibility. Apparently keynotes (perhaps other annotation as well?) take on the internal workset of the view, not the user-defined workset that happens to be current. If anyone knows of other culprits that cause this visibility issue, feel free to comment and I’ll update this post.

P.S. I recognize the interesting timing on a post with this title. It’s just that I started this draft a long time ago and didn’t want to change it. If you came here expecting something else, sorry. I think #BigBird is still trending on Twitter.  .-)

Key? Not!

In Revit on March 19, 2012 at 7:04 pm

When using sheet keynotes, I’ve encountered the problem of an entry appearing in the list on the sheet, but not appearing in any view on the sheet. Even if the list and all views are removed from the sheet and replaced, the rogue entry still comes back.
The reason for this is that the keynote actually does exist in the view, it’s just not visible. The visibility of the keynote is dependent on the visibility of the item it is attached to. The trick is figuring out how to display the missing object. The most common culprits I’ve seen cause this particular problem are tagging linked models and keynoting before a view is finalized. If the view range or far clip are adjusted, items disappear. If a section is flipped, there could be even more. So be careful out there!

Also, for a bit of fun, add a dimension string along a wall, including windows. Then adjust the view range so the windows are not shown. The dimension string will no longer include them, but when you bring the view range back they will again be dimensioned. This is the same concept, and even though it can be frustrating and confusing coming from a CAD background, this ranks up there with one of the things I like the most about Revit.

Don’t Fall Off the Edge

In Revit on January 31, 2012 at 12:03 pm

One of the great things about Revit is the ability to begin conceptually, and refine the design over time. Walls are a great example of this workflow. When you don’t want to bother with finish materials, a generic single-material wall everywhere will work fine most of the time.

Depending on your office standard, this can create an issue to watch out for. I have always placed dimensions to the face of core (stud, CMU, etc.). If you place a dimension on a single-material wall (even if the location line is set to face of core) and then change the wall to a type that includes a finish material, the dimension will stick with the outer face of the wall, and you will have to adjust it back to the core.

So when starting a new project, there are two options to save the headache of adjusting all these lines later (true, all you have to do is click the little blue dot to toggle the location, but still…). Either begin with walls that have finish, or wait to dimension until after wall types have been decided. I advise the former. If you’ve worked in Revit for any length of time, you know how easy it is to drive the design by using placed dimensions. The old school may throw a fit that “we don’t know what that will be yet” – if that’s the case, then just rename the wall to ‘Generic’.  .-)